Identifying Dreams and Setting Goals

Lesson Progress
0% Complete
 
Identifying Dreams and Setting Goals
Identifying Your Dreams
Once you have a good understanding of where you want to go, it’s time to sketch out what that might actually look like. You can make some notes in the space below, or use the back of this page for pictures and extra space.
What areas of life do you want to set goals in?
These areas should tie in with your vision statement. If not, evaluate it. Does it really reflect who you are?
In our example above, our vision statement was:
“In my life, I would like get the most out of each day by being as productive as possible. For me, being productive means feeling good about what I have accomplished at the end of the day. It is important to me to do this in a way that allows me to make enough money that I feel secure and able to get the things that I both need and want. As well, I need to feel challenged in my life. I like overcoming new problems and having new experiences.”
 
My specific dreams might include:

  • Set up an organized work space at the office.
  • Start my own consulting business.
  • Learn how to do yoga and practice it daily.
  • Climb Mount Everest.

Now, clearly some of these are achievable in the short term while others will take longer. Some will obviously take more work than others.
 
SPIRIT
Each objective should be broken down into several small, achievable goals that will help you get where you want to go. Good goals should have SPIRIT!
Specific
Be specific about what you want or don’t want to achieve. The result should be tangible and measurable. “Get organized” is pretty ambiguous; “Organize my desk and filing cabinet” is specific.
Prizes
Reward yourself at different points in the goal, particularly if it’s long-term. If your goal is to establish a consulting business, you might purchase a piece of artwork for your new office after you have written your business plan and discussed it with your accountant.
Individual
The goal must be something that you want to do. If your parents want you to become a doctor and you have no interest in medicine, you’re not going to want to work towards the goal.
Review
Review your progress periodically. Does the goal make sense? Are you stuck? Do you need to adjust certain parts of it? Could you work with a coach?
Inspiring
Frame the goal positively. Make it fun to accomplish. You could make a poster of the end result, frame it, and post it on the wall.
Time-Bound
Give yourself a deadline for achieving the goal. Even better, split the goal into small parts and give yourself a deadline for each item.
 
Writing Tips
Use action verbs in your goals, like:

Add
Arrange
Assemble
Build
Carry
Choose
Collect
Compute
Count
Demonstrate
Describe
Distribute
Draft
Explain
Identify
Initiate
Label
List
Plan
Rewrite
Select
Supervise
Train
Transform

 
Watch out for vague phrases like:

  • Be familiar with
  • Know how to
  • Understand